April22014
allthingseurope:

A quiet place in Venice, Italy (by Sergei Sigov)

allthingseurope:

A quiet place in Venice, Italy (by Sergei Sigov)

March232014

storiessongsandsorcery:

This is insanely useful!

(Source: beanboots-and-bows, via cupcakesandfireworks)

March212014
i’ve been with this awesome guy for six whole years & i’ve loved every minute of it. thank you God for this ridiculously undeserved blessing.

i’ve been with this awesome guy for six whole years & i’ve loved every minute of it. thank you God for this ridiculously undeserved blessing.

March182014

naliac:

Inside Alicia Silverstone’s wardrobe for Clueless. Her character Cher Horowitz had 56 costume changes throughout the film.

love

OMG SO IMPORTANT

(Source: fashion-and-film, via suicideblonde)

5PM

but really tho

(Source: dontyoucallyourhusbanddaddy, via practice-self-love)

5PM

If you have any doubt that the hashtag is a frighteningly powerful tool in our modern vocabulary, imagine a person you care about texting you that song’s title line out of the blue: “You’re beautiful.” Now think of the same person texting, “You’re #beautiful.” The second one is jokey, ironic, distant—and hey, maybe that’s what that person was going for. But it also hammers home that point that the internet too often asserts: You’re not as original as you once thought. “Beautiful” is analog, unquantifiable, one-in-a-million. #Beautiful, on the other hand, is crowded terrain. Ten more people have just tweeted about something or someone #beautiful since you started reading this sentence.

As more and more of our daily interactions become text-based — people preferring texting to phone calls, workplaces that rely heavily email and instant messaging—we’re developing ways to stretch our written language so it can communicate more nuance, so we can tell people what we mean without accidentally leading them on or pissing them off. Periods have becomemore forceful, commas less essential, and over the last few years, the hashtag has morphed into something resembling the fabled sarcasm font—the official keystroke of irony. Putting a hashtag in front of something you text, email, or IM to someone is a sly way of saying “I’m joking,” or maybe more accurately, “I mean this and I don’t at the same time.”

The #Art of the Hashtag

Thanks to Twitter, the hashtag has become an important linguistic shortcut. But while everyone from Robin Thicke to Beyoncé has used the symbol as part of their art, only a few have truly taken advantage of its culture-jamming possibilities.

Via @pitchforkmedia

(via npr)
5PM
March162014

Kat Dennings for Zooey Magazine,2014

(Source: fuckyeahkatdenningsdaily, via suicideblonde)

March102014
“If God gives such attention to the appearance of wildflowers—most of which are never even seen—don’t you think he’ll attend to you, take pride in you, do his best for you? What I’m trying to do here is to get you to relax, to not be so preoccupied with getting, so you can respond to God’s giving. People who don’t know God and the way he works fuss over these things, but you know both God and how he works. Steep your life in God-reality, God-initiative, God-provisions. Don’t worry about missing out. You’ll find all your everyday human concerns will be met.” Matthew 6:30-33 MSG (via pureblyss)

(via chelseatwatkins)

March82014
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